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Religion

  • Stidhams mark 30 years at LA Church of Christ

    In 1987 Ronald Reagan was in his last year as president of the United States, the Minnesota Twins won the World Series, and a gallon of gasoline cost 89 cents.

    In August of that year, Timothy D. Stidham and his wife Tanya, moved with their four children to Los Alamos from Sherman, Texas. And so began what would be 30 years of service to the Los Alamos Church of Christ. Thirty years and counting.

    The church will honor the Stidhams with a banquet at Fuller Lodge on Monday. Besides the meal, present and former church members will share memories and the Stidhams’ son Tony will present a commemorative slide show. In appreciation for their longtime service, the church is also sending the Stidhams on a Caribbean cruise.

    Tim began at the church as youth minister and served in that capacity for five years. In 1992 he became pulpit minister and has worked in that capacity ever since. Tanya has served as women’s minister since 2000. Their second son Tony is currently youth minister for the church, a position he has held since August, 2011.

    The couple met in Guam when their fathers were stationed there in the military. They have been married 43 years.

  • Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church to host classes this month

    In this 500th anniversary year of the Reformation, members of the community are invited to participate in a seven-session class called “By Heart: Conversations with Martin Luther’s Small Catechism,” offered by Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church.

    Using video, discussion and the book of the same name, Pastor Russ Sorensen will lead participants in exploring the biblical and historical context of Luther’s Small Catechism, the concise and accessible teaching guide he wrote for use in the family home. Luther left a rich and complex legacy through his life’s work, founded on his affirmation of the doctrine of justification “by grace alone, through faith alone, according to scripture alone.” In the 16th century, his church promoted new ideas and practices that many Christians take for granted today, including worship and scripture in the language of the common people, congregational hymn-singing, and the vocation of lay people in service to God.

    While the course is centered on Lutheran theology and spirituality, it is hoped that participants of all faith traditions will gain a greater understanding of Reformation history and of the many points of unity between Lutherans and other Christians.

  • WR United Methodist Church to help local family

    The White Rock United Methodist Church is working with other local churches to host a fundraiser to help support a local family, the Blakes, with their missionary work in Niger. Sean and Carrie Blake and their children are long-term, cross-cultural Christian missionaries with SIM.

    The family lives and works in Niger, West Africa. Carrie serves as Midwifery Tutor and is particularly involved in developing curriculum for a government-approved midwifery and nursing school. Sean serves as the SIM Projects Coordinator and general IT Administrator.

    The Blakes are responsible for raising the funds necessary to enable them to continue living and working in Niger.

    Several churches in the Los Alamos area stand behind the Blake family in prayer and the White Rock United Methodist and White Rock Baptist churches are their official sending churches.

    To help support them, the WRUMC is holding a garage sale starting at 9 a.m. Saturday, in support of the Blakes’ work in Niger.

    All proceeds from the sale will be donated to their SIM support account (simusa.org/give  Missionary # 029349). Come by 580 Meadow Lane on Saturday and support a great cause at the same time.

  • Holy Fire from Jerusalem arrives in Los Alamos

    Father Theophan and parishioner Emrys Tennessen, of Saint Job of Pochaiv Orthodox Church in Los Alamos traveled Wednesday to Alamosa, Colorado to rendezvous with Jordanna Lynch Perry of the Archangel Michael Orthodox Church in Pueblo, Colorado to receive the flame which originated this year in Jerusalem on Pascha night.
    They also stopped at the Monastery of the Holy Archangel Michael in Canones, New Mexico, on their way home, to pass the fire to the brothers there.
    The Holy Fire is a miracle that occurs on the eve of Pascha each year. At the appointed time, the Patriarch of Jerusalem enters the Holy Sepulcher where Jesus Christ was buried for three days, without any fire-making implements and unlit candles.
    There he waits for the Holy Fire to descend and ignite the candles, after which he emerges from the sepulcher and the fire is passed to the faithful.
    Lamps lit from this fire are sent all over the world to Orthodox churches. This year is the first time a concerted effort was made to make it available in the United States.
    Over the past three weeks it has spread, person to person, parish to parish, all across the country, and now to Los Alamos.

  • Local church effort goes a long way to help immigrants in Otero County

    BY ANN LEPAGE
    Special to the Monitor

  • Church youth to give presentation on Mexico house build trip

    The United Church of Los Alamos and the Universalist Unitarian Church will host a joint program at 9:30 a.m. Sunday, during its services, hosted by the youth.

    The youth were part of the recent delegation that spent their spring break with adult counterparts in Puerto Penasco, Mexico. The group built an incredible three homes in a one-week time period, changing the lives of three Mexico families forever.

    “Our kids in LA are great kids, always enjoy being around them in any setting,” said the Reverend Keith Lewis, the Pastor for Youth and Congregational Ministries, at the United Church. “This bunch especially, no gripes or complaints, just good old fashion sweat and hard work.”

    After a long journey and an overnight stay on the floor of a Phoenix church, the teams crossed the border, unpacked their campsites and prepared for the work ahead. The work includes mixing concrete by hand for the three build sites, followed by framing day, roofing day and stucco day. The final day was a beautiful bilingual passing of the keys to a new home, the first set of keys they have ever owned.

    According to Lewis, their hard work was so well done that teams not only finished their daily projects on time each day, but on some days, even finished early.

  • Church group to leave for Mexico

    Volunteers from the United Church of Los Alamos and the Unitarian Universalist Church will form a Circle of Love Saturday morning, as they prepare to leave for Puerto Penasco, Mexico, to build homes for the poor.
    The 50-plus-member team will build for three families this week, including a 78-year-old mother and her daughter that make $35 a week, a five-member family that makes $42 a week and a six-member family that makes $170 a week.
    As they do a formal key ceremony of Friday for each family, giving them the keys to their first real home, the team tells each family that the house is a gift and they owe them nothing for their work.
    The team will arrive back in Los Alamos Saturday night.

  • Create and hide unbreakable Easter eggs

    Easter is one of the most important days of the year for Christians. Easter Sunday is filled with symbolism and tradition, some of which harken back to early Christianity, while others trace their origins to paganism.
    The Easter Bunny and Easter eggs are two Easter traditions with less extensive histories. The Easter Bunny, according to sources including History.com, first arrived in America in the 1700s via German settlers who brought with them their tradition of an egg-laying hare called “Osterhase.” Children would make nests where the rabbit could lay its colored eggs. Eventually, the custom spread from Pennsylvania, where many German immigrants settled, to other areas around the country.
    Eggs are symbolic of new life and rebirth in many cultures. To Christians, eggs represent the resurrection of Jesus Christ.
    Another theory suggests that Christians were once forbidden to eat during the Lenten season preceding Easter. Therefore, Christians would paint and decorate eggs for Easter to mark the joyous celebration and cessation of penance and fasting.
    Even though these traditions have endured, Easter eggs themselves might not be so strong. This year, Easter celebrants may want to experiment with different materials that are more forgiving and more enduring than standard eggs.
    Wooden eggs

  • Women helping women
  • How to use digital devices this Lent for holy reflection

    BY HEIDI A. CAMPBELL
    Texas A&M University