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Milestones

  • Pop psychologist Joyce Brothers dead at 85

    Joyce Brothers, the pop psychologist who pioneered the television advice show in the 1950s and enjoyed a long and prolific career as a syndicated columnist, author, and television and film personality, has died. She was 85.

    Brothers died Monday of respiratory failure in New York City, according to her longtime Los Angeles-based publicist, Sanford Brokaw.

    Brothers first gained fame on a game show and went on to publish 15 books and make cameo appearances on popular shows including "Happy Days" and "The Simpsons." She visited Johnny Carson on "The Tonight Show" nearly 100 times.

    The way Brothers liked to tell it, her multimedia career came about "because we were hungry."

    It was 1955. Her husband, Milton Brothers, was still in medical school and Brothers had just given up her teaching positions at Hunter College and Columbia University to be home with her newborn, firmly believing a child's development depended on it.

    But the young family found itself struggling on her husband's residency income. So Brothers came up with the idea of entering a television quiz show as a contestant.

  • People In the News 05-08-13

    Lindsey Michal Gonzales of Los Alamos was among more than 2,750 students who received degrees from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln at commencement exercises May 3 and 4.
    Gonzales received a bachelor of science degree in mechanical engineering from the College of Engineering.
     

     

    The Los Alamos Gardening Club Scholarship of $5,000, in memory of Erla Mae Larson was awarded to Nathan Lang. He will attend the University of New Mexico and plans to major in biology or biomedicine. He has been on the cross country team for four years, and has been a downhill skier at Pajarito Mountain for six years. He has worked for the New Mexico Consortium building since 2012. 

    Nathan is the son of Michael and Laura Lang. 

  • Local births 05-05-13

    The following births were reported by Los Alamos Medical Center:

    March 20 — A boy, Cian David Gerrells, born to Erin and David Gerrells
    March 14 — A boy, Elijah Montano, born to Jennifer and Joshua Montano
    March 14 — A girl, Sydney Ariana Martinez, born to Kelly and Eric Martinez
    March 12 — A boy, Julian David Diaz, born to Vanessa and Jesus Diaz
    April 23 — A girl, EllaGrace Skidmore, born to Jet and Brad Skidmore

  • Birth Announcements 04-28-13

    • April 20: A boy, Jericho Sauer, born to DeAnna and Dominic Sauer
    • April 20: A boy, Jasper Alan Holmes, born to Karen A. and Matthew D. Holmes
    • April 19: A boy, Wesley Joseph Ellard, born to Lori and Shane Ellard
    • April 16: A girl, Payton Elaine St. Martin, born to Crystal and Nate St. Martin
    • April 2: A boy, Robert Anthony Padilla III, born to Brenda Rascon and Robert Padilla

  • People In the News 04-25-13

    The Santa Fe Farmers’ Market Institute Board announced the appointment of Deborah Tuck as the new executive director of the Institute.
    Tuck, an experienced nonprofit leader who is descended from six generations of Michigan farmers, has led nine different nonprofit organizations that have addressed critical contemporary social, cultural and environmental challenges. She served as the first President/CEO of the Grand Canyon National Park Foundation, as the executive director of two family foundations — the Ruth Mott Fund (Flint, Michigan) and the Needmor Fund (Boulder, Colorado) — and as Special Projects Director of the Northern Lights Institute, a conservation research group focusing on natural resource issues in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming.
    She was the founder and CEO of Coalfield Housing, a unique effort of nine major coal companies and nine chapters of the United Mine Workers to solve housing problems in the West Virginia coalfields. She has served on the boards of more than 40 organizations across the United States, including as chair of the League of Conservation Voters. 

     

  • People In the News 04-21-13

    Garret M. Nelson
    First Lt. Garret M. Nelson, USMC, received his wings as a United States Naval Aviator in the Marine Corps.
    He will be flying the AH-1W Cobra Helicopter. Lt. Nelson will be training in San Diego, then stationed in North Carolina. Lt. Nelson is a 2004 graduate of Los Alamos High School and a 2010 United States Naval Academy (Annapolis) graduate with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering.
    Garret is the son of Lori and Lew Nelson and the grandson of Nina and
    Allie Laird.

    Benjamin Batha
    Benjamin Batha, a senior majoring in computer science and political science at the University of Rochester, has been named to the Dean’s List for academic achievement for the fall 2012 semester.
    Batha, a resident of Los Alamos, is the son of Margo and Steven Batha, and a graduate of Los Alamos High School.

    Neil Peterson
    Current Ph.D. student, Neil Peterson earned a School of Nursing teaching award from the University of Virginia, for the second year in a row.
    Peterson grew up in Los Alamos and still has family in town.
    Peterson, a part time emergency room clinician at the University of Virginia Medical Center, also won the all-university GTA award for students in math, engineering and nursing.

  • People In the News 04-16-13

    Local student, Batha, named to Dean’s List at University of Rochester
    Benjamin Batha, a senior majoring in computer science and political science at the University of Rochester, has been named to the Dean’s List for academic achievement for the fall 2012 semester.
    Batha, a resident of Los Alamos, is the son of Margo and Steven Batha, and a graduate of Los Alamos High School.
    The University of Rochester, founded in 1850, is a private research university located in Rochester, N.Y., (pop. 212,000) on the south shore of Lake Ontario.
    The University offers a unique undergraduate curriculum, with no required courses, that emphasizes a broad liberal education through majors, minors and course “clusters”— a Rochester innovation—in the three main areas of knowledge: humanities, social sciences, and physical sciences/engineering.
    The University (on the web at rochester.edu) is also home to the world-renowned Eastman School of Music, as well as graduate professional schools of business, education, medicine, and nursing.  

  • Sun-Times: Famed Movie Critic Roger Ebert Dies
  • Local EMT recognized for services

    The Board of Directors of the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) recently recognized William F. Purtymun, a National Ski Patroller with the Pajarito Mountain Ski Patrol, for achieving 30 consecutive years as a Nationally Registered EMT.
    This distinction is an honor held by few EMTs.
    To maintain his status as a Nationally Registered EMT, Purtymun completed, on a biennial basis, the most comprehensive recertification program for Emergency Medical Technicians in America.
    He not only completed courses to refresh his fundamental knowledge and skills but also attended a minimum of two hours per month of additional continuing education courses to advance his knowledge on new lifesaving skills. This includes recently completing the National Association of EMT Tactical Combat Casualty Care course.
    By maintaining his Nationally Registered status and completing regular continuing education courses, Purtymun is among the few elite EMTs with the most training in pre-hospital emergency medical care in the nation.

  • 40 years on, Vietnam troop withdrawal remembered

    Forty years ago, soldiers returning from Vietnam were advised to change into civilian clothes on their flights home so that they wouldn't be accosted by angry protesters at the airport. For a Vietnamese businessman who helped the U.S. government, a rising sense of panic set in as the last combat troops left the country on March 29, 1973 and he began to contemplate what he'd do next. A young North Vietnamese soldier who heard about the withdrawal felt emboldened to continue his push on the battlefields of southern Vietnam.

    While the fall of Saigon two years later — with its indelible images of frantic helicopter evacuations — is remembered as the final day of the Vietnam War, Friday marks an anniversary that holds greater meaning for many who fought, protested or otherwise lived the war. Since then, they've embarked on careers, raised families and in many cases counseled a younger generation emerging from two other faraway wars.

    Many veterans are encouraged by changes they see. The U.S. has a volunteer military these days, not a draft, and the troops coming home aren't derided for their service. People know what PTSD stands for. And they're insisting that the government take care of soldiers suffering from it and other legacy injuries from Iraq and Afghanistan.