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Entertainment

  • LALT announces 2014-15 season

    The Los Alamos Little Theatre announces a slate of five shows for its 2014-15 season.
    September
    “Tower of Magic,” by local playwright Tess Light, explores the search for one’s true self amidst the chaos of an idiosyncratic family — a woman with near-magical creative talents, an obsessed ornithologist, a compulsive mezzo-soprano, a murderous chef, a mostly mute savant, a twinned linguist, and just to stir the pot a visitor who is a, yawn, civil engineer.
    November
    “And Then There Were None,” by the ever-popular Agatha Christie, in which ten guilty strangers, trapped on an island, are one by one accused of murder and die. Agatha Christie last graced the LALT stage in the 2010-11 season with “Go Back for Murder.”
    January
    “Murdered to Death,” by Peter Gordon, turns Agatha Christie on her head in a spoof led by the inept Inspector Pratt. The audience may be left wondering if laughter is the murderer.
    March

  • Taos natives combine talents for new single

    TAOS — Taos natives and Native Rock recording artists Robby Romero and Robert Mirabal have combined their talents to release a new “alter-Native” single “Iron Horse.” “Iron Horse” commemorates the Summer of the Red Willow, when Taos’ Kit Carson Park was renamed “Red Willow” in June 2014 by the Town of Taos.
    “When the opportunity presented itself, I suggested that the Town of Taos change the name of Kit Carson Park to Red Willow Park to honor the people of the Red Willow,” Romero said. “I made the suggestion to kindle a conversation about one-sided perspectives that are more often then not ‘his story’ – not ‘history.’”
    “Robby brought me out of the corn fields of Taos Pueblo to join in igniting a collective fire and creating a poetic dialogue,” Mirabal said. “I was a bit reluctant at first, however; as fate has it, the inevitable Kit Carson name-change provided the artistic momentum for a coming together of our music.”
    “Iron Horse,” written collaboratively by Mirabal and Romero, will be performed at a special “Summer of the Red Willow” concert at KTAOS Solar Pavilion on Sept. 20.

  • 'Tower of Magic' starts Friday at the Little Theater

    “Tower of Magic” is about finding that safe place within which one can live authentically, and then finding the courage to venture out into the light of the broader world.
    The cast includes an obsessed ornithologist, a compulsive mezzo-soprano, a linguistically challenged savant, a socially challenged linguist, a homicidal chef, a woman with magical creative talents and, to round out the mayhem, a civil engineer.
    The play was written by local playwright Tess Light and runs Sept. 5-20. Performances are 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sunday matinee on Sept. 14.
    Tickets $14 for adults, $12 for students and seniors.For more information visit lalt.org.  

  • LA jazz artist to open this season's Brown Bag

    The Los Alamos Arts Council announces the opening of the new season of its Brown Bag Performance Series. The first concert is noon Sept. 3 at Fuller Lodge.
    The first concert of the series features a jazz performance by Dr. Marcos Cavalcante. The LAAC’s Brown Bag concerts showcase local performing artists and are free and open to the public. Performances are generally the first Wednesday of the month.
    Cavalcante is a Brazilian from Bahia. He has lived in New Mexico since 2007 and has a home and studio in Los Alamos.
    A guitar player, composer and arranger, he developed his musicianship in jazz, Brazilian jazz and popular music (Música Popular Brasileira), classical guitar, World Music and several kinds of folk music. 

He has played many concerts and taught workshops in Brazil, Japan and the United States. In the U.S., he has a been a performer in concerts and presented workshops both in artistic and academic venues such as Indiana University, University of Louisville, Interlochen Center for the Arts (Traverse City, Michigan), Duke University and Oklahoma University. He has had a very prolific career as a player, composer and arranger.

  • Comedy night supports HOPE pregnancy center

    HOPE Pregnancy Center is hosting “A Night of Laughs,” a fundraising event featuring comedian Mike Williams. A silent raffle and dessert gala will round out the evening. Williams’ will be there with a blend of stand up and musical comedy and clean fun. The evening starts at 6 p.m. Sept. 8, at Crossroads Bible Church, 97 East Road. The event is free to the public.
    HOPE Pregnancy Center is a Christian nonprofit committed to supporting those facing unplanned pregnancies by providing information and education, as well as material resources. HOPE also offers free pregnancy tests, parent mentoring and post-abortion support. All services are free and confidential.
    For more information about HOPE or “A Night of Laughs,” call 662-2300.  

  • Christian band to share inspiration in White Rock

    Over the years, there have been a number of Christian rock bands that have graced New Mexico stages.
    One of them will be in Los Alamos County next week.
    The White Rock Baptist Church will host a concert by Christian Rock band Everfound.
    Youth Pastor Jesse Mark said he has made it part of his ministry to get kids and their families listening to positive music. He has been working with middle school and high school students for five years.
    The “Welcome Back to School” music evening encourages youth and their parents to enjoy music together. The show starts at 6 p.m. Sept. 6, however the community is urged to come early and take part in other activities available, including tailgating, games and gift card giveaways from local sponsors (Morning Glory Bakery, Smith’s, Daniel’s Café and CB Fox, among others).
    Mark said many of the area churches will also be involved in the festivities to offer a true community feel to the event.

  • Wartime tunes still delight

    The Los Alamos Big Band played old time music at the Gordon’s Concert Series Aug. 22. The band performed the sounds of Duke Ellington, Glen Miller and Benny Goodman to name a few.

  • Episode 4 of ‘Manhattan’ discussed

    The Los Alamos Historical Society wants to thank the community for their continued interest and support of discussions of WGN’s TV series “Manhattan.” Here are some of the common questions we heard at the discussion of the fourth episode this past Sunday and on social media. Every week the society will be updating a bulletin board in the museum to continue exploring questions and reactions as the 13-episode series continues. Previous episodes are discussed on the website, losalamoshistory.org, on our Facebook page, and in the museum.
    Join the Los Alamos Historical Society Sundays at Time Out Pizzeria in Los Alamos from 7-9:30 for a viewing and discussion of “Manhattan” (TV-14 rating).
    Were Los Alamos doctors Army doctors?
    Yes, Los Alamos was served by an Army hospital. Originally staffed by one doctor and three nurses, the hospital grew to include a radiologist, pediatrician, dentists, an internist who had to enlist in the Army to accept the invitation to join the staff, a pharmacist, lab technicians, more nurses, and an Great Dane/Russian wolfhound mutt named Timoshenko who looked after the front steps.
    Where did they test explosives?
    Explosives tests were carried out at sites on current LANL property, such as the Gun Site. These sites were only a few miles away from the Tech Area.

  • LA Big Band to take the stage

    The Los Alamos Summer Concert Series returns to Ashley Pond today with a performance by the Los Alamos Big Band at 7 p.m.
    The show is free of charge and paid for by the sponsors of the Concert Series.
    The Los Alamos Big Band has been a fixture in town since 1945 when the “Pop band” was called the LA All-Stars. In 1984, they became the LA Big Band, an “oldies band.”
    Jan McDonald has been their director since that year. They still play the music of the 1930s and the music of the war years playing swing, two-step, fox trots and waltzes, but it’s OK dancers to do their own thing. LABB also play music from the late 1940s, 1950s and even a little of the 1960s.
    The band plays a lot of music from some of the bandleaders like Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman, the Dorsey and the Gershwin brothers, Artie Shaw and the royals, Count Basie and Duke Ellington. They use the same arrangements as those directors and will be play such standards as “String of Pearls,” “I’ll Be Seeing You,” “Take the ‘A’ Train,” “In the Mood,” “It Don’t Mean a Thing (if it ain’t got that swing)” and “One O’Clock Jump.” They have more than 300 danceable, classic songs in their repertoire.

  • Episode 3 of 'Manhattan' discussed

    As the drama continues in WGN’s new series, “Manhattan,” there was another great turnout for the Los Alamos Historical Society’s viewing of the third episode.
    “Manhattan” presents a fictionalized look at life in Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project. Below are some of the common questions that we heard that night and on social media. Every week the Society will be updating a bulletin board in the Museum to continue exploring questions and reactions as the 13-episode series continues.
    Previous episodes are discussed on the website, losalamoshistory.org, on our Facebook page, and in the museum.
    Join the Los Alamos Historical Society Sundays at Time Out Pizzeria in Los Alamos from 8–9:30 p.m. for a viewing and discussion of Manhattan (TV-14 rating).
    Were they swimming in Ashley Pond?
    Most likely Colonel Cox was not swimming at Ashley Pond since the Pond was closed early on during the project due to a fatal accident that occurred. He could be swimming at a pool that was located near Anchor Ranch (today known as S Site).
    Did the Project use polygraphs?