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Entertainment

  • LASO fall concert Friday

    Familiar tunes, percussive street sounds, cowboy music of the Wild West and soaring melodies —  these will be part of the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra’s Fall Concert at 7 p.m. Friday at the Crossroads Bible Church.  
    In his second year as music director for LASO, conductor Dr. Ivan Shulman will lead the orchestra in a concert tour.
    The Brahms “Academic Festival Overture” will open the concert. Composed as a thank you note to the University of Breslau, after receiving an honorary doctorate, Brahms included a variety of college drinking songs. Always the curmudgeonly joker, these appear loose and episodic — in a sort of “tongue in cheek” structure.
    Violinist Roberta Arruda, originally from Brazil, will solo in the Saint-Saens Violin Concerto No. 3. Saint-Saens has been described as the “compleat Frenchman” — accomplished pianist, organist, prolific author on many subjects, linguist, raconteur and world traveler.
     “I produce music like an apple tree produces apples,” Saint-Saens said. His third violin concerto is one of his most popular works.

  • Arruda to solo with LASO Oct. 5

    On the top of a list of varied things Roberta Arruda likes to do is playing her violin. She likes to play in chamber groups and big and small orchestras, but best of all she likes to solo.  
    “Playing as a soloist is very special,” she said. At 7 p.m. Oct. 5 at the Crossroads Bible Church, Arruda will solo with the Los Alamos Symphony Orchestra. She will play the “Saint-Saens Violin Concerto No. 3” —a work that Arruda grew up listening to on recordings by Josh Bell.
    Arruda, born in Brazil to non-musical parents, began her musical journey on the recorder at the age of seven. By 10, she had switched to the violin. It was a perfect match and she has continued to study violin all over the world — the United States, France, Belgium and Hungary.  
    Now, living in New Mexico, she has an active life, which involves teaching at New Mexico State University, playing with the La Catrina Quartet (the resident quartet at NMSU), and playing with the Santa Fe Pro Musica.  
    In past years, she has played with the Opera Southwest, the San Juan Symphony, UNMSO, the Santa Fe Symphony and the New Mexico Symphony Orchestra.

  • Brave New Brass set to perform

    Brave New Brass is a brass ensemble recently formed in Los Alamos, based on previous brass quintets organized by Dave and Deniece Korzekwa.
    The members of Brave New Brass have a broad interest in the music available for small brass ensembles of various combinations and have been performing as a group in Los Alamos for the past several months.
    At the Brown Bag program at noon Oct. 3 in Fuller Lodge, Brave New Brass will present a variety of music written or arranged for brass instruments (quintet, trio, duet, and solo) ranging from the Baroque music of the 17th century (Purcell and Bach) to contemporary composers of brass music (Frackenpohl and Ewazen), with some jazz and tangos thrown in for variety.
    Members of the group are all Los Alamos musicians, with Jim Beinke (French horn), Deniece Korzekwa (tuba), Dave Korzekwa (trumpet), Mandy Marksteiner (trumpet) and Bruce Warren (trombone).
    Beinke received his bachelor’s degree from Northern Iowa University and his master’s degree from the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. After teaching band and orchestra in Iowa and Wisconsin for 22 years, he entered seminary. He received his master’s degree and was a pastor in the Philadelphia area and later in Michigan. He had not played the French horn for almost 50 years and took it up again in retirement.

  • PEEC and Reel Deal team up

    The Reel Deal Theater and the Pajarito Environmental Education Center are bringing back their partnership to show nature films over the fall and winter months. The series will begin at 6 p.m. Oct. 4 with a showing of “The Big Year.”
    “This is the perfect film to kick off the series,” said Katie Watson of PEEC. “It’s a birding film, so it will appeal to our many birders in Los Alamos, but it also stars Jack Black, Steve Martin and Owen Wilson, so fans of these actors, even if they aren’t birders, will want to watch it, as well.”  
    “The Big Year” tells the story of three competing birders hoping to get a “big year” and be named Birder of the Year. The film is as funny as one might expect, with Black, Martin and Wilson starring, but at the same time, it doesn’t treat birding as a joke. The film was featured in a series of articles and behind-the-scenes peeks in WildBird Magazine.  
    In one article, director David Frankel, said, “There’s no mocking. It’s very respectful.” He went on to say that the cast and crew became birders after working on the film. “Once you’re aware of birds, you can’t not be drawn to the movement in the skies or in the trees of winged creatures.”

  • This week on PAC-8, Sept. 28-Oct. Oct. 4


    THIS WEEK ON PAC-8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, September 28, 2012
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM County Council Replay (9-25-12)
    03:00 PM Celebration of Aging
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society
    07:00 PM Ice Cream Man
    07:30 PM Spirituality Today
    08:00 PM Clear Heart, Clear Mind
    09:00 PM FSTV

    Saturday, September 29, 2012
    FSTV

    Sunday, September 30, 2012
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:00 PM That Which Is
    09:00 PM Trinity on the Hill
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

    Monday, October 1, 2012
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! LIVE
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM Spirituality Today
    11:30 AM The LA Times – Legislative Review with Jim Hall
    12:00 PM Army Newswatch
    12:30 PM Elizabeth Claire Project
    01:30 PM Summer Video Classes Showcase
    03:00 PM The David Pakman Show
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!

  • The telephone is ringing

    When out enjoying a leisurely lunch, incessant cell phone ringing can be annoying.
    It’s even worse when the cell phone won’t stop ringing and the owner won’t answer it. Jean (Kate Ramsey) found herself in that very situation in Los Alamos Little Theater’s presentation of “Dead Man’s Cell Phone,” directed by Gwen Lewis and produced by David Schiferl.
    Gordon (Eric Björklund) wouldn’t answer his phone. Not because he didn’t want to, but rather because he couldn’t. He was dead. He also happened to be sitting next to Jean in a café, while they were lunching. After unsuccessfully trying to talk to him, her response to silence the annoying contraption was to answer it. What happened after that was a bit strange.
    The cell phone became a part of her life. It constantly rang and she constantly answered it, even though she did not know the people on the other end. No matter where she was or what she was doing, she answered the phone.

  • 'Education is Hope' screening at Reel Deal

    Former Los Alamos High School student William O’Donnell, has produced the film “Education is Hope,” tracing the impact of education in Kenya on students, their family and their community.
    There will be a free screening at 6 p.m. Saturday at the Reel Deal Theater.
    “Education is Hope” is a grassroots film that will transport the audience to a country where poverty and back-breaking labor can usually only be overcome by education.
    Education for young Kenyans is a sometimes elusive goal, hindered by the day-to-day responsibilities of maturing children to help support their families through hard labor. Dylan Westfall and O’Donnell embark on a journey through three months in Kenya.
    While living, sleeping and eating with the locals, they document the hardships and beliefs held among many Kenyan’s that only education can lift the poor, diseased and marginalized out of desperate circumstances.
    In the film, locals tell their stories, which illustrate that the hope of education is warranted. It shows that those who complete high school and some form of higher education find opportunities that would otherwise be non-existent.
    Meet the producers and Fredah, a Kenyan woman featured in the film, with a reception to follow.

  • This week on PAC-8, Sept. 21-27

    THIS WEEK ON PAC-8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, September 21, 2012
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM County Council Replay (9-11-12)
    03:00 PM Celebration of Aging
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society
    07:00 PM Ice Cream Man
    07:30 PM Spirituality Today
    08:00 PM Clear Heart, Clear Mind
    09:00 PM FSTV

    Saturday, September 22, 2012
    FSTV

    Sunday, September 23, 2012
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:00 PM That Which Is
    09:00 PM Trinity on the Hill
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

    Monday, September 24, 2012
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! LIVE
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM Spirituality Today
    11:30 AM The LA Times – Legislative Review with Jim Hall
    12:00 PM Army Newswatch
    12:30 PM Elizabeth Claire Project
    01:30 PM Summer Video Classess Showcase
    03:00 PM The David Pakman Show
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!

  • '50 Shades' of disappointment

    Those who are not fans of romance or erotic novels should steer clear of “50 Shades of Grey.” Though that sums up the feelings on this particular book and the review could end there, let’s take a closer look at what made this book so disappointing.
    After hearing rave reviews, it was only natural to be curious. Despite the fact that romance and the erotic genre have never been of interest, the praises of this book were sung repeatedly and it was too tempting to pass up.
    The tome, written by E.L. James, is the first part of a trilogy and introduces the reader to Anastasia Steele, a recent college graduate, and Christian Grey, a multi-millionaire who carved out a place in the business world at a young age.
    The couple meet by chance, when Steele’s college newspaper reporter friend Katherine Kavanaugh becomes ill and is unable to keep her interview appointment with Grey. Being the good friend she is, Steele steps in and agrees to interview him on Kavanaugh’s behalf.
    Despite the fact that she finds him attractive, Steele dismisses any thought of becoming involved with someone like Grey because of his status in the business world and because she believes that he would never be interested in someone like her.

  • Dead men tell no lies

    Technology has allowed humans to interact in different ways. It’s not uncommon for friends that live on opposite ends of the U.S. to get on Facebook and chat as a way to stay in touch.
    Meeting new, different people is not beyond the realm of possibilities these days and even though they may never meet face-to-face, that doesn’t stop folks from socializing via social media. Cell phones have also opened up communication, by allowing texts to be sent in seconds, replacing phone calls because they are quicker and can be sent when phone conversations are not possible.
    What would happen, though, if you found a stranger’s cell phone one day and decided to start conversations with the people calling that phone? That’s exactly what Jean (Kate Ramsey) does in “Dead Man’s Cell Phone,” presented by Los Alamos Little Theatre.
    Though Jean has never owned a cell phone, she decides to answer Gordon’s phone, once she realizes that he has died in the café, where she is enjoying some soup. As a result of her curiosity, she encounters some interesting characters along the way. She also starts to imagine what Gordon was like and dreams up a personality for him. Not only does Jean meet Gordon’s family, but she also meets his mistress.