.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Entertainment

  • Sting unable to save his Broadway musical

    NEW YORK (AP) — Sting will be going down with his ship.
    Producer Jeffrey Seller said Tuesday that the Grammy Award-winning songwriter’s Broadway musical “The Last Ship” will close when his stint in the show ends Jan. 24 at the Neil Simon Theatre.
    Sting, who wrote the songs, jumped into the musical in early December, playing a shipyard foreman that had been portrayed by Jimmy Nail. While that improved sales, they didn’t skyrocket and the future looked bleak without him.
    “We made the musical we wanted to make and we’re fiercely proud of it,” Seller said. “It’s been spectacular that Sting could be in it for its final weeks because now we go out with some degree of triumph. Not what I wanted. But some degree of triumph.”
    “The Last Ship” is a semiautobiographical story about a prodigal son who returns to his northern England shipbuilding town to reclaim the girl he abandoned when he fled years before. He finds the workers are now unemployed and entertaining the idea of building one last boat to show off their skill and pride.

  • Putting Oscar on the block 


    LOS ANGELES (AP) — ‘Tis the season when many stars are preparing for months-long campaigns with the distant hope of bringing home an Academy Award come February.
    But winning isn’t the only way to snag one of the coveted statuettes. Enthusiastic collectors with several hundred thousand to spare can achieve Oscar glory at the right auction house. And they could do it next as soon as the weekend.
    The latest prize to go under the hammer is James Cagney’s 1942 best actor Oscar for his role in “Yankee Doodle Dandy.” Auctioneer Nate D. Sanders has required an $800,000 minimum bid for the trophy, which they predict could sell for upward of $1 million by the time the auction closes.
    “It’s the most prestigious Oscar to hit the market in recent years,” said Sam Heller, a representative of Nate D. Sanders. For one, he notes, there have only been three best actor Oscar available in two decades.
    The scarcity of Oscars for purchase isn’t an accident. Historically, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has not looked kindly on the free market sale of the prize.

  • This Week on PAC 8, Jan. 16-22

    THIS WEEK
    ON PAC 8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, Jan. 16, 2015
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM The Tom Hartman Program
    11:00 AM County Council Meeting Replay 1-6-13
    03:00 PM Gallery Discussion for Edith Warner & Tiano– Bridge Between Two Worlds
    04:00 PM Uprising
    05:00 PM Tourism Goes Green
    05:30 PM Senior Olympics
    06:00 PM Democracy Now!
    07:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society
    08:30 PM The Garage
    09:00 PM Bongo Boy Rock and Roll
    09:30 PM Global 3000
    10:00 PM NNMCAB Meeting
    12:00 AM Free Speech TV

    Saturday, Jan. 17, 2015
    Free Speech TV

    Sunday, Jan. 18, 2015
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:30 PM Trinity on the Hill
    09:30 PM Generations
    11:00 PM That Which Is
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

  • Sublime tribute band to play in Taos

    It’s been almost fourteen years since Badfish, a Tribute to Sublime played its first show in Matunuck, Rhode Island. Since then, Badfish has not only become a fixture on the national touring circuit, but the band has consistently sold out venues along the way. 
    This past May, Badfish sold out a weekend at the acclaimed Nelson Ledges Quarry Park in Garrettsville, Ohio, packing in 5,000 fans each day for one of the most memorable weekends in the band’s history.
    Now, with a tour beginning this week, the members of Badfish have decided to shake things up by returning to Sublime’s iconic 1992 debut, 40 Oz. to Freedom — which sold more than two million copies — and perform the album in its entirety.
    The show will start at 8 p.m. Jan. 27 at the KTAOS Solar Center in Taos. Tickets are $15-18. It is a 21 and over show.
    “It’s actually a great album to play front to back,” said Badfish drummer Scott Begin. “Like all of Sublime’s material, there are a lot of stylistic variations that keep it fun for us and the crowd. Also, it’s a great experience to hear these songs in the order that they were released. Everyone knows what ‘the next song’ is going to be.”

  • Murder mystery a spoof of Christie's classic

    In November, Los Alamos Little Theatre presented a classic whodunit murder mystery, Agatha Christie’s “And Then There Were None.”
    Beginning Friday, LALT will present another murder mystery. While the time period is also in the late 1930s of England, this play is off beat.
    A spoof on the murder mystery classic, “Murdered to Death,” written by Peter Gordon, follows Inspector Pratt who fights his own incompetence to deduce the murderer.
    The plot follows the grand tradition of a long weekend visit at a country estate, where things quickly go awry in a most ridiculous fashion. The owner of the house has invited several guests for the weekend to her home, where her annoyed niece and the worthless butler also reside. The audience soon finds out the odd relationships between the characters.
    Once the murder occurs, it is very possible that the inefficient Acting Inspector Pratt, along with his more resourceful assistant Constable Thompkins, may never solve the case.
    The director of “Murdered to Death” is Patrick Webb, who came to Los Alamos from Fairbanks, Alaska. While in Alaska, Webb had the privilege of playing the role of the Frenchman Pierre in a local production of the play.

  • An evening with ‘Downton Abbey’

    Patrons dressed the part for the 2014 viewing of Downton Abbey. There will be another opportunity to have “An Afternoon at Downton Abbey Tea, 2 p.m. Jan. 4 at the Betty Ehart Senior Center Great Room, 1101 Bathtub Row. LARSO/Courtesy

  • Theatrical ensemble graces stage

    Britain’s flamboyant Baroque ensemble, Red Priest, will perform Antonio Vivaldi’s iconic work, “The Four Seasons.” Presented by the Los Alamos Concert Association, the concert will also feature works by Biber, Corelli, Purcell and Van Eyck in a program called Carnival of the Seasons.
    Red Priest starts the theatrical performance 7 p.m. Jan. 9 at Duane Smith Auditorium.
    Red Priest, renowned for bringing a theatrical sensibility to Baroque repertoire, takes its name from Vivaldi, known in his time as The Red Priest because he was, in fact, a priest with bright red hair. In an interview on National Public Radio, founder Piers Adams commented, “We tend to forget that people in the olden days were having fun. They were like us, and they weren’t all serious. They were experimenting and doing their own thing.”
    The ensemble includes recorder player Adams, violinist David Greenberg, cellist Angela East and harpsichordist David Wright. Performing from memory, they take an innovative approach to period performance, creating a virtual orchestra through their imaginative arrangements and stagecraft.

  • This Week on PAC 8, Dec. 19-25

    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, Dec. 19, 2014
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM The Tom Hartman Program
    11:00 AM County Council Meeting Replay 12-16-14
    03:00 PM Gallery Discussion for Edith Warner & Tiano– Bridge Between Two Worlds
    04:00 PM Uprising
    05:00 PM Tourism Goes Green
    05:30 PM Senior Olympics
    06:00 PM Democracy Now!
    07:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society – “New Mexico Wines: Past to Present”
    08:30 PM The Garage
    09:00 PM Bongo Boy Rock and Roll
    09:30 PM Global 3000
    10:00 PM NNMCAB Meeting
    12:00 AM Free Speech TV

    Saturday, Dec. 20, 2014
    Free Speech TV

    Sunday, Dec. 21, 2014
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:30 PM Trinity on the Hill
    09:30 PM Generations
    11:00 PM That Which Is
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

  • Christmas Tubas

    Nothing says Christmas quite like the sound of a choir performing carols. This choir happens to be composed of tubas and euphoniums. The group came together in 2002, and has played at various venues throughout Los Alamos every holiday season since then.
    The choir is made up of a core of adult musicians from other groups in Los Alamos (Big Band, Symphony, etc.) and is augmented by high school students. They play an mix of arrangements specifically created for a tuba choir. The concert will be 7:15 p.m. Dec. 20 at Fuller Lodge. Admission is free and is sponsored by The Los Alamos Arts Council.
    Top from left, Larry Bronisz, Dave Korzekwa, Ryan Finn, Sally Grindstaff, Jenny Lee, Jerry Morzinski and Deniece Korzekwa.

  • Colors of the holidays

    Like light through a prism, Los Alamos has many unique “colors” of musical talent to offer.
    The Los Alamos Community Winds invites the public to attend its 4th Annual Holiday Prism Concert as we showcase the many sounds of the season. The show begins 7 p.m. Dec. 13 at Crossroads Bible Church.
    Featured are local string quartet, String Theory performing “Carol of the Bells.” They will be joined by several other players for Karl Jenkins “Palladio.”
    Also on the program are vocalist Rene LeClaire performing music by Miklos Rosza and John Jacob Niles, pianist Frances Meier with music by Claude Thornhill and the First United Methodist Church of Los Alamos Handbell Choir under the direction of Trudy Gabel.
    “Prism Concerts were originally conceived in some of our nation’s colleges and universities as ways to promote academic programs in music and recruit students by showcasing (in a single concert) all the different facets of the ensemble curriculum,” said LACW Director Ted Vives. “Our hope is to do the same for the amazing variety of musical talent that we have here in Los Alamos.”