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Entertainment

  • Concert to be held at Del Norte Credit Union

    Friday’s Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series show will be at Del Norte Credit Union, 1000 Trinity Dr. “We’re calling the evening ‘Co-op Night’ and we thank DNCU, Zia Credit Union, LA Schools CU, LA Food Co-op and the Española Community Market for their support of the Series and support of our town,” Coordinator Russ Gordon said.
    Friday’s concert is free of charge thanks to the sponsors in the community and starts at 7 p.m. The public is asked to bring their own chairs.
    The music will be by Guy Forsyth and his new band, the Hot Nut Riveters from Austin, Texas. Forsyth was the original lead singer of the Asylum Street Spankers and he called them “Texas’ original Recession Era band.”
    “That band played two of the most bizarre, fun and downright naughty concerts this town has ever seen,” Gordon said. “When I found out that Guy Forsyth was leading his own roots-rock and blues band about five years ago we booked that outstanding group three different times and they we’re tremendous musicians and great entertainers.”

  • Film review: Birth mix-up explores sense of identity

    Immediately upon birth, most of us inherit a culture, race, religion and economic status. We go home to a large house in a modern city, or a shack in an occupied territory. Freedom might belong to us, or it might not. Everything that makes us “us” starts from these facts, over which we have no control.
    In other words, who we are depends on whom we are born as.
    So what happens if we are switched at birth? Who are we then? “The Other Son” (2013, rated PG-13, French), screening at 6:30 p.m. today at Mesa Public Library, explores this idea with more depth and care than any other I’ve seen.
    Joseph Silberg (Jules Sitruk) and Yacine Al Bezaaz (Mehdi Dehbi) were born as each other.
    One lives in Tel Aviv, Israel, while the other resides in the Palestinian West Bank, occupied by troops the first’s father, a colonel, commands. But had they gone home as infants with their correct birth mothers, their situations would be entirely reversed.
    The film thoroughly examines the differences between the boys’ lives, and without any contrivance. Even the story of the original mix-up does not feel forced. It is entirely plausible. It has probably happened.

  • This Week on PAC 8, Aug. 15-21

    THIS WEEK
    ON PAC-8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

  • A night of Broadway

    For more than 70 years, Los Alamos Light Opera has served theater lovers and performers alike, bringing the best of Broadway to our community.
    LALO is doing it again this weekend with Broadway on the Hill, featuring all of the classical musical numbers that has made the organization what it is today. This night of entertainment is also a fundraiser to keep this Los Alamos community classic going for many more years.
    In April of 1943, scientists, security personnel, engineers, and military personnel moved to Los Alamos to begin their secret work on the Manhattan Project. By the end of the same year, the Light Opera was born, welcoming people from all walks of life to work both on stage and off as actors, directors, set builders, costumers, and all of the other theatrical accoutrements. Since then, the non-profit organization has produced over 60 community-run shows, including classic favorites like “The Music Man,” “The Sound of Music,” “HMS Pinafore,” and, most recently in 2013, “The Mystery of Edwin Drood.”
    Now, LALO once again will showcase the talent of Los Alamos with selections from both old Broadway classics and modern hits, including “Phantom of the Opera,” “Guys and Dolls,” “Oliver,” and so many more.

  • Comedy star dead at 63

    SAN RAFAEL, Calif. (AP) — Robin Williams committed suicide by hanging himself with a belt at his San Francisco Bay Area home, sheriff's officials said Tuesday.

    Marin County Sheriff's Lt. Keith Boyd said Williams' personal assistant found the actor Monday in a bedroom at his Tiburon home. The actor also had superficial cuts on his wrist, and a pocketknife was found nearby.

    Boyd said Williams, star of "Good Will Hunting," ''Mrs. Doubtfire," ''Good Morning, Vietnam" and dozens of other films, was seeking treatment for depression. He would not say whether the actor and comedian left a suicide note.

    The 63-year-old comedian's wife had last seen him the night before and had left the home that morning thinking he was still asleep. His personal assistant later came to the home and became concerned when he knocked on the door and got no response.

    Toxicology test results on whether Williams had any drugs or alcohol in his system are weeks away. Boyd said authorities will continue to investigate his death.

    The actor had periodic bouts of substance abuse and depression for years. Just last month, Williams announced he was returning to a 12-step treatment program.

  • 'Manhattan' second episode discussed

    There was another big turnout for the Los Alamos Historical Society’s viewing of the second episode of WGN’s new series, Manhattan, a fictionalized look at life in Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project.
    Below are some of the common questions that we heard that night and on social media. Every week the Society will be updating a bulletin board in the Museum to continue exploring questions and reactions as the 13-episode series continues.
    Previous episodes are discussed on our website, www.losalamoshistory.org, on our facebook page, and in the museum.
    Join the Los Alamos Historical Society Sundays at Time Out Pizzeria in Los Alamos from 8–9:30 pm for a viewing and discussion of Manhattan (TV-14 rating).
    Was the Little Theater here?
    The Little Theater did have its first production in 1943. The play was titled “Right About Face.” Performances took place wherever space could be found, such as at Fuller Lodge and the Enlisted Men Mess Hall (Little Theater’s current location). However, the Enlisted Men Mess Hall was not converted into a theater complete with a stage, tiered seating, dressing rooms, etc. until 1972. The complete history of Little Theater productions is available online: /lalt.org/archive/index.shtml.
    Why was “USED” stamped on the sheets?

  • LA soprano to perform in ABQ recital

    On Saturday, Aug. 16, Los Alamos soprano Melissa Riedel, along with Albuquerque pianist Darby Fegan, will be presenting a recital at St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church in Albuquerque.
     The recital will begin at 4 p.m., and will include pieces from several different composers, including Richard Strauss and John Jacob Niles. The church is located at 601 Montaño Rd. NW in Albuquerque. Riedel is a native of Los Alamos and performs regularly in Northern New Mexico and surrounding areas, along with teaching privately at her studio in Los Alamos.
    Fegan is an accomplished pianist who is part of the Performing Arts faculty at Sandia Prep, in addition to playing and singing with a number of groups in the Albuquerque area. Donations will be accepted, with all proceeds going to St. Michael and All Angels’ Food Pantry, which assists approximately 50 needy families per week.
     

  • Community, Historical Society discuss first episode of ‘Manhattan’

    There was a large turnout for the Los Alamos Historical Society’s viewing of the premiere of WGN’s new series, Manhattan, a fictionalized look at life in Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project. There was a great discussion following the show, and the Society has collected some of the common questions that we heard that night and on social media. Every week the Society will be updating a bulletin board in the Museum to continue exploring questions and reactions as the 13-episode series continues.
    Join the Los Alamos Historical Society Sundays at Time Out Pizzeria in Los Alamos from 8–9:30 pm for a viewing and discussion of Manhattan.
    Why does Los Alamos look like a desert?
    The show was filmed (in part) at the Bruns Army Hospital near the Santa Fe University of Art and Design, so our trees and mountains are missing.
    There aren’t scorpions in Los Alamos, are there?
    They’re not common, but yes there are! PEEC even has one you can visit (and is looking for a sponsor to name it).
    Where was Dorothy McKibbin?
    The episode didn’t show McKibbin or her office at 109 East Palace in Santa Fe where she welcomed new arrivals. But you can see the gate to her office in the History Museum.
    Where were the émigré scientists?

  • LACA Season At-A-Glance

    Anderson & Roe Piano Duo, 4 p.m., Sept. 28
    Salzburg Marionette Theater with pianist Orion Weiss, 7 p.m. Nov. 1
    Red Priest, 7 p.m. Jan. 9
    Cuarteto Lationamericano with Daniel Binelli, bandoneón, 4 p.m. March 15
    Ethos Percussion Group, 4 p.m. April 15

    VENUE
    Duane Smith Auditorium on the campus of Los Alamos High School
    1300 Diamond Drive
    Wheel chair accessible
    Box office opens 45 minutes before performance

    TICKET OUTLETS
    CB Fox and Smith’s in Los Alamos and White Rock
    Lensic Box Office in Santa Fe

    COMPLETE ARTIST, VENUE AND TICKET
    INFORMATION
    losalamosconcert.org
     

  • LACA announces new season

    The Los Alamos Concert Association has announced its 69th season which will feature the added attraction of a newly refurbished venue.
    The first phase of a multi-year upgrade of the Duane Smith Auditorium on the campus of Los Alamos High School is currently under way. New seating, carpeting, paint, and improved hall lighting will greet concert-goers at the first concert in September. Plans for future hall upgrades over the next three years include lobby redesign as well as acoustic, technical and back-stage improvements.
    “The Smith Auditorium is an important community asset,” said Ann McLaughlin, LACA Artistic Director. “We look forward to welcoming our audience to a fresh and attractive space that will showcase our great artists at their very best.”
    LACA audiences will have their first look at the hall on Sept. 28 with a performance by the Anderson and Roe Piano Duo. Millions have watched their Emmy-nominated music videos on YouTube and the press has dubbed them “the Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers of the keyboard” for their imaginatively choreographed performances.