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Entertainment

  • Comedy night supports HOPE pregnancy center

    HOPE Pregnancy Center is hosting “A Night of Laughs,” a fundraising event featuring comedian Mike Williams. A silent raffle and dessert gala will round out the evening. Williams’ will be there with a blend of stand up and musical comedy and clean fun. The evening starts at 6 p.m. Sept. 8, at Crossroads Bible Church, 97 East Road. The event is free to the public.
    HOPE Pregnancy Center is a Christian nonprofit committed to supporting those facing unplanned pregnancies by providing information and education, as well as material resources. HOPE also offers free pregnancy tests, parent mentoring and post-abortion support. All services are free and confidential.
    For more information about HOPE or “A Night of Laughs,” call 662-2300.  

  • Christian band to share inspiration in White Rock

    Over the years, there have been a number of Christian rock bands that have graced New Mexico stages.
    One of them will be in Los Alamos County next week.
    The White Rock Baptist Church will host a concert by Christian Rock band Everfound.
    Youth Pastor Jesse Mark said he has made it part of his ministry to get kids and their families listening to positive music. He has been working with middle school and high school students for five years.
    The “Welcome Back to School” music evening encourages youth and their parents to enjoy music together. The show starts at 6 p.m. Sept. 6, however the community is urged to come early and take part in other activities available, including tailgating, games and gift card giveaways from local sponsors (Morning Glory Bakery, Smith’s, Daniel’s Café and CB Fox, among others).
    Mark said many of the area churches will also be involved in the festivities to offer a true community feel to the event.

  • Wartime tunes still delight

    The Los Alamos Big Band played old time music at the Gordon’s Concert Series Aug. 22. The band performed the sounds of Duke Ellington, Glen Miller and Benny Goodman to name a few.

  • Episode 4 of ‘Manhattan’ discussed

    The Los Alamos Historical Society wants to thank the community for their continued interest and support of discussions of WGN’s TV series “Manhattan.” Here are some of the common questions we heard at the discussion of the fourth episode this past Sunday and on social media. Every week the society will be updating a bulletin board in the museum to continue exploring questions and reactions as the 13-episode series continues. Previous episodes are discussed on the website, losalamoshistory.org, on our Facebook page, and in the museum.
    Join the Los Alamos Historical Society Sundays at Time Out Pizzeria in Los Alamos from 7-9:30 for a viewing and discussion of “Manhattan” (TV-14 rating).
    Were Los Alamos doctors Army doctors?
    Yes, Los Alamos was served by an Army hospital. Originally staffed by one doctor and three nurses, the hospital grew to include a radiologist, pediatrician, dentists, an internist who had to enlist in the Army to accept the invitation to join the staff, a pharmacist, lab technicians, more nurses, and an Great Dane/Russian wolfhound mutt named Timoshenko who looked after the front steps.
    Where did they test explosives?
    Explosives tests were carried out at sites on current LANL property, such as the Gun Site. These sites were only a few miles away from the Tech Area.

  • LA Big Band to take the stage

    The Los Alamos Summer Concert Series returns to Ashley Pond today with a performance by the Los Alamos Big Band at 7 p.m.
    The show is free of charge and paid for by the sponsors of the Concert Series.
    The Los Alamos Big Band has been a fixture in town since 1945 when the “Pop band” was called the LA All-Stars. In 1984, they became the LA Big Band, an “oldies band.”
    Jan McDonald has been their director since that year. They still play the music of the 1930s and the music of the war years playing swing, two-step, fox trots and waltzes, but it’s OK dancers to do their own thing. LABB also play music from the late 1940s, 1950s and even a little of the 1960s.
    The band plays a lot of music from some of the bandleaders like Glenn Miller, Benny Goodman, the Dorsey and the Gershwin brothers, Artie Shaw and the royals, Count Basie and Duke Ellington. They use the same arrangements as those directors and will be play such standards as “String of Pearls,” “I’ll Be Seeing You,” “Take the ‘A’ Train,” “In the Mood,” “It Don’t Mean a Thing (if it ain’t got that swing)” and “One O’Clock Jump.” They have more than 300 danceable, classic songs in their repertoire.

  • Episode 3 of 'Manhattan' discussed

    As the drama continues in WGN’s new series, “Manhattan,” there was another great turnout for the Los Alamos Historical Society’s viewing of the third episode.
    “Manhattan” presents a fictionalized look at life in Los Alamos during the Manhattan Project. Below are some of the common questions that we heard that night and on social media. Every week the Society will be updating a bulletin board in the Museum to continue exploring questions and reactions as the 13-episode series continues.
    Previous episodes are discussed on the website, losalamoshistory.org, on our Facebook page, and in the museum.
    Join the Los Alamos Historical Society Sundays at Time Out Pizzeria in Los Alamos from 8–9:30 p.m. for a viewing and discussion of Manhattan (TV-14 rating).
    Were they swimming in Ashley Pond?
    Most likely Colonel Cox was not swimming at Ashley Pond since the Pond was closed early on during the project due to a fatal accident that occurred. He could be swimming at a pool that was located near Anchor Ranch (today known as S Site).
    Did the Project use polygraphs?

  • This Week on PAC 8, Aug. 22-28

    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, Aug. 22, 2014
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 PM County Council Meeting Replay 8-15-14
    02:00 PM Senior Olympics
    03:00 PM Barranca Mesa Speech Contest
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Behind the White Coat – Avadh Salje
    05:30 PM Senior Olympics
    06:00 PM Democracy Now!
    07:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society – La Mesa Fire – A Wake-up Call?”
    08:30 PM The Garage
    09:00 PM Bongo Boy Rock and Roll
    09:30 PM Global 3000
    10:00 PM The New Pearl Harbor
    11:00 PM NNMCAB Meeting
    12:00 AM Free Speech TV

    Saturday, Aug. 23, 2014
    Free Speech TV

    Sunday, Aug. 24, 2014
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:30 PM Trinity on the Hill
    09:30 PM Generations
    11:00 PM That Which Is
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

  • Missoula Children's Theater

    “Blackbeard the Pirate” was performed last month by the Missoula Children’s Theater. The pirates from left, Peija Cole, William McTeigue, Xavier McTeigue, Elia Vasquez, Josh Fuller and Aliana Montoya.

  • Concert to be held at Del Norte Credit Union

    Friday’s Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series show will be at Del Norte Credit Union, 1000 Trinity Dr. “We’re calling the evening ‘Co-op Night’ and we thank DNCU, Zia Credit Union, LA Schools CU, LA Food Co-op and the Española Community Market for their support of the Series and support of our town,” Coordinator Russ Gordon said.
    Friday’s concert is free of charge thanks to the sponsors in the community and starts at 7 p.m. The public is asked to bring their own chairs.
    The music will be by Guy Forsyth and his new band, the Hot Nut Riveters from Austin, Texas. Forsyth was the original lead singer of the Asylum Street Spankers and he called them “Texas’ original Recession Era band.”
    “That band played two of the most bizarre, fun and downright naughty concerts this town has ever seen,” Gordon said. “When I found out that Guy Forsyth was leading his own roots-rock and blues band about five years ago we booked that outstanding group three different times and they we’re tremendous musicians and great entertainers.”

  • Film review: Birth mix-up explores sense of identity

    Immediately upon birth, most of us inherit a culture, race, religion and economic status. We go home to a large house in a modern city, or a shack in an occupied territory. Freedom might belong to us, or it might not. Everything that makes us “us” starts from these facts, over which we have no control.
    In other words, who we are depends on whom we are born as.
    So what happens if we are switched at birth? Who are we then? “The Other Son” (2013, rated PG-13, French), screening at 6:30 p.m. today at Mesa Public Library, explores this idea with more depth and care than any other I’ve seen.
    Joseph Silberg (Jules Sitruk) and Yacine Al Bezaaz (Mehdi Dehbi) were born as each other.
    One lives in Tel Aviv, Israel, while the other resides in the Palestinian West Bank, occupied by troops the first’s father, a colonel, commands. But had they gone home as infants with their correct birth mothers, their situations would be entirely reversed.
    The film thoroughly examines the differences between the boys’ lives, and without any contrivance. Even the story of the original mix-up does not feel forced. It is entirely plausible. It has probably happened.