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Entertainment

  • Chinese style different than most operas

    For many, Chinese opera remains something of a mystery. Some have never had the chance to view these works that, while being very beautiful and entertaining, are also incredibly different from the Western style of opera. “Dr. Sun Yat-sen,” a piece by Huang Ruo and Candace Mui-ngam Chong, does a nice job of mixing Chinese and American opera styles in order to reach a broad audience. Granted, it is still a very different experience than one would expect from, say, a Mozart opera, but it is definitely worth viewing.
    Conductor Carolyn Kuan is delightful. She and her orchestra produce an outstanding array of sounds, ranging from relentless percussion in sections that moves the action and helps the audience to feel the anxiety and fear of the characters, to graceful sustained passages that underline the romantic nature of the characters’ action on stage. Kuan has done an outstanding job with this difficult piece, as has the orchestra.

  • This Week on PAC 8, Aug. 1-7

    THIS WEEK ON PAC-8

    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, Aug. 1, 2014
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM County Council Meeting Replay – 7-29-14
    02:00 PM Senior Olympics
    03:00 PM Barranca Mesa Speech Contest
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Behind the White Coat – Jennifer Hollingsworth
    05:30 PM Nature Center Opening Ceremony
    06:00 PM Democracy Now!
    07:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society – La Mesa fire – A Wake-Up Call?”
    08:30 PM The Garage
    09:00 PM Bongo Boy Rock and Roll
    09:30 PM In Focus
    10:00 PM The New Pearl Harbor
    11:00 PM NNMCAB Meeting
    12:00 AM Free Speech TV

    Saturday, Aug. 2, 2014
    Free Speech TV

    Sunday, Aug. 3, 2014
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:30 PM Trinity on the Hill
    09:30 PM Generations
    11:00 PM That Which Is
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

  • Creating Mayhem
  • This Week on PAC 8, July 25-31

    THIS WEEK
    ON PAC-8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, July 25, 2014
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM County Council Meeting
    02:00 PM Senior Olympics
    03:00 PM Barranca Mesa Speech Contest
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Behind the White Coat – Jennifer Hollingsworth
    05:30 PM Nature Center Opening Ceremony
    06:00 PM Democracy Now!
    07:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society - “109 East Palace: A 400 Year Microcosm of Santa Fe History”
    08:30 PM The Garage
    09:00 PM Bongo Boy Rock and Roll
    09:30 PM In Focus
    10:00 PM The New Pearl Harbor
    11:00 PM NNMCAB Meeting
    12:00 AM Free Speech TV

    Saturday, July 26, 2014
    Free Speech TV

    Sunday, July 27, 2014
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:30 PM Trinity on the Hill
    09:30 PM Generations
    11:00 PM That Which Is
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

  • Double bill's contrast is the right balance

    At times, it seems as though most audiences feel that an evening at the opera is intended to be long, boring and stuffy, with a minimum of laughter. However, Santa Fe’s offering of Mozart’s “The Impresario” paired with Stravinsky’s “Le Rossignol” may change some minds.
    The first opera of the evening is “The Impresario,” a short, one-act piece by Mozart. This particular singspiel (the term for comic German operas with spoken dialogue instead of singing) is a short, humorous one-act work.
    Mozart intended the humor to be relevant, so the dialogue is changed to appeal to audiences to whom it is presented. Director Michael Gieleta folded in some of Mozart’s impressive concert arias and worked with dramatist Ranjit Bolt to create English dialogue that would appeal to 21st century audiences. The result is witty, and an interesting commentary on the difficulty of balancing what is popular with what is artistically satisfying.
    Mozart’s opera is followed by a contrasting work: Igor Stravinsky’s sublime “Le Rossignol.” Many may be familiar with Hans Christian Andersen’s tale of the Emperor and his mechanical bird, which is flashy but cannot replace the lovely song of the real nightingale.

  • Future Shock

    It was about as simple a goal as could be made: Bradley King wanted to make a film he wasn’t embarrassed about.
    But with his directorial debut, “Time Lapse,” earning praise and awards on the film festival circuit, it’s safe to say that goal has been met.
    King, a native of Los Alamos, has long had a dream of helming a feature film. And with the help of producer BP Cooper, that dream has been realized. He and Cooper co-wrote the screenplay for the film and were the main creative drivers behind it.
    “Time Lapse,” which stars Danielle Panabaker, Matt O’Leary and George Finn, centers on a group of 20-somethings who accidentally stumble onto a camera that can take Polaroid photos 24 hours into the future.
    It takes very little time for Jasper (Finn), a dog racing fanatic, to realize the camera can be used for financial gain. While amateur painter Finn (O’Leary) is initially against the idea, he finds that the camera can see his work in the future, as well.
    Of course, it also takes very little time for their plan to go horribly, horribly wrong, particularly when shady bookie Ivan (Jason Spisak) becomes weary of losing his money to the restraint-less and addiction-prone Jasper, who becomes increasingly obsessed with keeping the future exactly the way the photos revealed it would be.

  • 'Manhattan' viewing party starts Sunday

    Los Alamos is now featured in a major television series. “Manhattan,” the story about the Manhattan Project and the building of the atomic bomb will air on WGN American Sunday night.
    The Los Alamos Historical Society and Time Out Pizzeria on Central Avenue are hosting a viewing party and discussion group for each of the season’s 13 episodes. The premiere is 7 p.m. Sunday, with subsequent episodes will air 8 p.m. Sundays.
    According to WGN, “Manhattan” is about “brilliant but flawed scientists” who lived in Los Alamos during World War II and were racing to build the world’s first atomic bomb.
    The characters are fictional, and the drama focuses on family life, such as what was it like for wives not knowing about their husbands’ work.
    The writers and producers of “Manhattan” have noted that the show is fiction, but based in the time period of the Manhattan Project.
    Because of the crossover between history and fiction, Los Alamos Historical Society staff will be on hand for a post-show discussion each week to talk about things that really happened, things that could have happened and things that are completely made up.

  • This Week on PAC 8, July 18-24

    THIS WEEK ON PAC-8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, July 18, 2014
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM Democracy Now!
    11:00 AM County Council Meeting
    02:00 PM Senior Olympics
    03:00 PM Barranca Mesa Speech Contest
    04:00 PM Al Jazeera DC Bureau
    05:00 PM Behind the White Coat – Ekhard Salje
    05:30 PM Nature Center Opening Ceremony
    06:00 PM Democracy Now!
    07:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society - “109 East Palace: A 400 Year Microcosm of Santa Fe History”
    08:30 PM The Garage
    09:00 PM Bongo Boy Rock and Roll
    09:30 PM EuroMax
    10:00 PM The New Pearl Harbor
    11:00 PM NNMCAB Meeting
    12:00 AM Free Speech TV

    Saturday, July 19, 2014
    Free Speech TV

    Sunday, July 20, 2014
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:30 PM Trinity on the Hill
    09:30 PM Generations
    11:00 PM That Which Is
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

  • 'Carmen' shows added, on sale

    General Director Charles MacKay announced today that an additional performance of Bizet’s “Carmen” has been added 8 p.m. Aug. 18.
    “There has been such a demand for tickets, and all 12 performances have been filling so quickly,” MacKay said. “I am happy that we are able to offer more of our patrons a chance to see this wonderful new production of Bizet’s masterpiece.”
    The standard patron amenities will be offered, such as shuttles from Santa Fe and Albuquerque, preview buffet beginning at 5:30 p.m., Prelude Talks in Stieren Hall at 6 and 7 p.m., Opera Shop and food and beverage services.
    Taking advantage of Santa Fe’s Southwestern setting and advances in video projection, director Stephen Lawless brings “Carmen” closer to home, setting the drama in the Mexico of recent past.
    A mercurial creature who defies categories, Carmen has been rivetingly interpreted by both sopranos and mezzo-sopranos. Singing the role in all performances through July 18, Argentinian born Daniela Mack will bring the darker vocal luster of the mezzo-soprano voice to the stage.

  • Love can save the day

    This season, for the first time, The Santa Fe Opera presents Beethoven’s only opera, “Fidelio,” a true masterpiece that must be seen in person to be fully appreciated. This production, staged with care and thought, is not to be missed.
    “Fidelio” is the story of Florestan, a man taken prisoner by a political enemy. Driven by her great love, his wife Leonore dresses like a boy she calls Fidelio and goes to where Florestan is imprisoned to try to save him. The director’s choice of era in which to stage this production is a great one, and the costumes and staging work together to help the audience relate to the idea that the fight against injustice and tyranny are ongoing.
    Bulgarian Soprano Alex Penda has an impressive instrument that demonstrates great flexibility along with astonishing dynamic control. Penda’s delicate high pianissimi are perfection, and her chesty lower notes are surprisingly resonant. It is difficult to imagine a more suitable voice for Leonore. Florestan doesn’t appear until later in the opera; however, tenor Paul Groves leaves a lasting impression on the audience. His voice is a superb match for Penda’s and his acting is effective without being overdone.