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Entertainment

  • Sting unable to save his Broadway musical

    NEW YORK (AP) — Sting will be going down with his ship.
    Producer Jeffrey Seller said Tuesday that the Grammy Award-winning songwriter’s Broadway musical “The Last Ship” will close when his stint in the show ends Jan. 24 at the Neil Simon Theatre.
    Sting, who wrote the songs, jumped into the musical in early December, playing a shipyard foreman that had been portrayed by Jimmy Nail. While that improved sales, they didn’t skyrocket and the future looked bleak without him.
    “We made the musical we wanted to make and we’re fiercely proud of it,” Seller said. “It’s been spectacular that Sting could be in it for its final weeks because now we go out with some degree of triumph. Not what I wanted. But some degree of triumph.”
    “The Last Ship” is a semiautobiographical story about a prodigal son who returns to his northern England shipbuilding town to reclaim the girl he abandoned when he fled years before. He finds the workers are now unemployed and entertaining the idea of building one last boat to show off their skill and pride.

  • Putting Oscar on the block 


    LOS ANGELES (AP) — ‘Tis the season when many stars are preparing for months-long campaigns with the distant hope of bringing home an Academy Award come February.
    But winning isn’t the only way to snag one of the coveted statuettes. Enthusiastic collectors with several hundred thousand to spare can achieve Oscar glory at the right auction house. And they could do it next as soon as the weekend.
    The latest prize to go under the hammer is James Cagney’s 1942 best actor Oscar for his role in “Yankee Doodle Dandy.” Auctioneer Nate D. Sanders has required an $800,000 minimum bid for the trophy, which they predict could sell for upward of $1 million by the time the auction closes.
    “It’s the most prestigious Oscar to hit the market in recent years,” said Sam Heller, a representative of Nate D. Sanders. For one, he notes, there have only been three best actor Oscar available in two decades.
    The scarcity of Oscars for purchase isn’t an accident. Historically, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has not looked kindly on the free market sale of the prize.

  • This Week on PAC 8, March 20-26

    THIS WEEK
    ON PAC 8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, March 20, 2015
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM The Tom Hartman Program
    11:00 AM County Council Meeting Replay 3-03-15
    02:00 PM MPL Authors Speak Series
    03:00 PM Gallery Discussion for Edith Warner & Tiano– Bridge Between
    Two Worlds
    04:00 PM Uprising
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM United in Christ
    07:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society – New Mexico Arts Panel
    08:30 PM The Garage
    09:00 PM Bongo Boy Rock and Roll
    09:30 PM Community Central
    10:00 PM NNMCAB
    12:00 AM Free Speech TV

    Saturday, March 21, 2015
    Free Speech TV

    Sunday, March 22, 2015
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:30 PM Trinity on the Hill
    09:30 PM Generations
    11:00 PM That Which Is
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

  • Opera Southwest closes season with 'La Boheme'

    Albuquerque’s Opera Southwest closes its 42nd Season with four performances of Giacomo Puccini’s “La bohème,” which run from this Sunday through March 29 at the National Hispanic Cultural Center, 1701 4th St., SW.
    Bohème musically intertwines the youthful gaiety of the 19th Century Parisian Latin Quarter with the despair of poverty, cold and death and the passion and eloquence of young love.
    Leading the cast in her OSW debut will be soprano Emily Dorn, whose credits include the roles of both Carmen and Micaёla in “Carmen,” Violetta in “La traviata,” and Fiordiligi in “Cosi fan tutte” at the Savonlinna Opera Festival, Finland, and the Dresden Semperoper, Germany.
    Additional cast members include Sarah Asmar, who sang Desdemona in 2012’s “Otello,” as Musetta; her real-life husband Joshua Kohl, Pinkerton in the 2013 “Madama Butterfly,” as Rodolfo; baritone Timothy Mix, our 2013 Don Giovanni, as Marcello; former apprentice artist Joseph Hubbard as Colline; and local favorites Paul Bower as Schaunard, Joseph Cordova as Parpignol and Sam Shepperson in the double role of Alcindoro and Benoit.
    Maestro Anthony Barrese will conduct, with Maestro Domenico Boyagian conducting on March 25. David Bartholomew will direct.

  • A ghostly love story in ballet form

    Love, betrayal and forgiveness reign as the New Mexico Dance Theater Performance Company presents “Giselle.”
    The ghostly love story will be performed 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday at the Duane W. Smith Auditorium.
    NMDT-PC has made a huge impact on the Los Alamos community.
    During its 14-year existence, NMDT-PC, directed by Susan Baker-Dillingham, has presented at least 19 original and/or classical ballets including “Dracula,” “Snow White,” “The Sleeping Beauty,” “Cinderella,” “The Wizard of Oz,” “Alice in Wonderland,” “Aladdin,” “A Christmas Carol,” “The Nutcracker” and several Mixed Bills.
    “Giselle,” first performed in 1841, is one of the most famous of the ballets blanc or white ballets. The term “ballet blanc” refers to scenes in which the ballerina and female members of the corps all dress in white.
    NMDT-PC’s production of “Giselle” will feature Sarah Dale as Giselle, Devon McCleskey as Albrecht, and Frank Macias as Hilarion. Company members Louisa Belian, Rebecca Cai, Akane Dunn, Naomi Joyce and Megan Hemphill will also stand out. Sets are by Holly Haas and costumes by Marcy Anderson.

  • Red Elvises to play at LA Posse Lodge

    The Gordon’s Summer Concert Series is in need of financial support for the upcoming season, so organizers are bringing out the big guns.
    Specifically, Igor and the Red Elvises.
    Igor and the Red Elvises, a staple at the Summer Concert Series and what principal organizer Russ Gordon calls “Los Alamos’ favorite band,” will perform at the Los Alamos Posse Lodge Saturday. Show time is 7:30 p.m.
    Gordon is currently in the process of booking acts for the summer, but said funds are needed to bring those acts into town.
    Tickets for the Red Elvises show are $20. All proceeds from the show will benefit the Summer Concert Series.
    The series brings bands, both local and from out-of-town, to various sites around Los Alamos County. While Ashley Pond is one of the usual place for the concert to be set, there have also been concerts at the Smith’s parking lot, Los Alamos National Bank, Overlook Park and other spots.
    As one might guess, band founder Igor Yuzov is from the former Soviet Union and started the band in 1995 to play what he dubbed “Serbian surf rock” — rock and roll was illegal in the Soviet Union. Yuzov, a master showman, claims a vision of Elvis Presley came to him and told him to start playing rock music.

  • This Week on PAC 8, March 13-19

    THIS WEEK
    ON PAC 8
    Views expressed on programs shown on PAC8 do not necessarily reflect the views of the manager, staff, or board.

    Friday, March 13, 2015
    06:00 AM Democracy Now! – Live
    10:00 AM The Tom Hartman Program
    11:00 AM County Council Meeting Replay 3-03-15
    02:00 PM MPL Authors Speak Series
    03:00 PM Gallery Discussion for Edith Warner & Tiano– Bridge Between Two Worlds
    04:00 PM Uprising
    05:00 PM Democracy Now!
    06:00 PM United in Christ
    07:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society
    08:30 PM The Garage
    09:00 PM Bongo Boy Rock and Roll
    09:30 PM Community Central
    10:00 PM Los Alamos Historical Society – “Now It Can Be Told”
    12:00 AM Free Speech TV

    Saturday, March 14, 2015
    Free Speech TV

    Sunday, March 15, 2015
    06:00 AM FSTV
    05:30 PM Key to the Kingdom
    06:00 PM Drawing Men to Christ
    07:00 PM United Church
    08:30 PM Trinity on the Hill
    09:30 PM Generations
    11:00 PM That Which Is
    12:00 PM Free Speech TV

  • Celebrate St. Patrick's Day with Irish dancing

    Belisama Irish Dance Company presents the 8th annual of its Rhythm of Fire performance on Saturday at the James A. Little Theatre in Santa Fe. Showtimes are 2 p.m. and 7 p.m.
    The high-energy show features award winning Irish dancers, as well as young up-and-coming performers in a family-friendly, foot stomping performance of traditional and contemporary Irish dancing.
    Tickets are $15 for adults, $12 for students and seniors, and $10 for children under 12 at ticketssantafe.org or 988-1234. The theater is located at New Mexico School for the Deaf, 1060 Cerrillos Road.
    This year’s Rhythm of Fire features live music with fiddling and singing by Maria Jones, Adrienne Bellis and Lisa Carman. Audiences will also enjoy both new and well-loved favorite choreography by company directors Adrienne Bellis and Celia Kessler, champion dancers Maria Jones and Shannon Kossmann and former Riverdance lead Michael Patrick Gallagher. 


  • 'Mister Roberts' sets sail at LALT

    Welcome aboard a U.S. Navy Cargo Ship the USS Reluctant, which is operating in the back waters of the Pacific in the spring of 1945. This is not a very happy ship.
    The sailors aboard are suffering from the deadly boredom that comes from the routine delivery of cargo during wartime. To make things worse, the ship’s captain is a cantankerous, small-minded man who refuses to allow the men liberty. The only ones making life on the ship tolerable are “Mister” Roberts, Doc and the feisty woman-chasing Ensign Pulver.
    Mister Roberts shares the crew’s dislike for the captain, which is one reason for his popularity. Roberts joined the Navy to fight and hates being inactive almost as much as he hates the captain. He’s eager to get into the war before it ends. He is repeatedly writing requests for transfer off the “Reluctant” to a combat ship. This infuriates the captain, who is struggling to get a promotion to commander.
    Brad Lounsbury, director of “Mister Roberts,” shares his vision for the production.

  • Review: 'Not Quite Right' turns out just right

    What do you do when you can’t sleep at night? Make some lopsided pottery in your garage? Amuse yourself with hand puppets? Gaze at the stars? Sign up for an all night dance marathon?
    For the three intertwined couples in this tale of domestic woe, that is exactly what they do — which opens up many proverbial can of worms at 3 a.m.
    The first act centers around an older couple that has seems to have lost their spunk. Caught between what he was and what he has become, Marty (Steven Oakey) is trying desperately to make everything “fine.” His wife, Carol (Kat Sawyer) tries to snap him into reality and is very belittling at times. A new hobby of Marty’s brings out issues that are not so easily resolved.
    At the same time, a younger couple, Andrew and Jessica (Alex Thorne and Stephanie Dees) are dancing in a marathon try to stay awake by talking about their sons, when ideas of expanding their family are discussed becomes an argument.
    A dream sequence that is comedic, as well as terrifying plagues one of them.
    Moving on to a year later, past issues are resolved — to a point, as new ones arise — and again, no one is getting any sleep. The couples are still trying to live as though everything is “fine.”