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Technology is gr8! Or is it?

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According to a quote by Mark Kennedy, “All of the biggest technological inventions created by man — the airplane, the automobile, the computer — says little about his intelligence, but speaks volumes about his laziness.” 
Technology has become a big part of a teenager’s daily life. It allows teens to do things that were not even considered possible a few decades ago.
Grandparents will tell their grandchildren overly exaggerated stories of how they walked so many miles to school in the snow because cars weren’t invented yet.
Today, cell phones and computers provide instant communication, but has texting taken over teens’ lives?
A common opinion is that teenagers have become too dependent on technology.
Some can’t go a day without having their phone in their pocket or updating their Facebook status.
What has happened to kids going outside and meeting in the neighborhood? They now turn to electronics rather than getting outside, being active and meeting face to face. How does this change their lives and are the changes good? One thing is for sure, technology is here to stay.
A teenager without a cell phone is unconnected in the broad network of teenage life.
Texting is a way for teens to figure out what’s going on. It’s a way to socialize and perhaps talk to that one cute boy a girl can’t get the courage to talk to in person.
It has also probably caused this generation to be the best at mult-itasking and to have to most reflexive thumbs.
Computers are amazing and have changed society. In an instant, teens can Google the answer to any question.
Email and all sorts of online communities allow teens to communicate with others around the world, giving them a better understanding of what is going on outside of their lives.
They can see the homeless mothers and the starving children in other towns and countries and it has led to many teens coming up with ways to help those in need.
However, texting is a distraction that can cause car accidents, and many teens have become depressed as a result of spending too much time on the computer.
Also, that essay due tomorrow on the history of World War I can most likely be copied and pasted with the click of a mouse.
Though they probably use some form of it everyday, most teenagers probably don’t  have a clue as to how the technology they used every day works.
The cell phones, computers, iPod’s and TVs make life more enjoyable, but teens should use them and benefit from them, not rely on them. Technology should not be a necessity, but a privilege.  
Teens should get outside and enjoy nature while they’re young because they never know what the technology of the next generation might be, so they might want to get their “I used to have to ride in a car to school rather than teleport” stories ready to tell their grandchildren.

--Dana Crooks is a Staff Writer for Teen Pulse