.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Olions assume control for one-act plays

-A A +A
By Kirsten Laskey

A woman searching for her identity, an actor unprepared for the play and a man struggling with love and finances take center stage in the Los Alamos High School drama club’s one act plays.For the one-acts, the Olions Thespian Club, seized control of all the theatrical operations – from the directing to the lighting, the students called the shots. The community had an opportunity to see the young thespians’ handiwork last week and the opportunity to experience the one-acts will be available at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday in the ‘Topper Theater.Nina Saunders, Olions sponsor, encourages the community to attend. “What’s amazing about this experience is it’s completely student done,” she said. “It’s a chance to see students’ influence on the art form.”The plays students chose were “Dent’ity,” “Actor’s Nightmare” and “Fire and Darkness,” which was written by LAHS student Victoria Webster.Andrea Shisler, the director of “Dent’ity,” described the play as “hilarious.” “It’s about a young woman’s search to find her true self,” she said.Throughout the play, Shisler said, the young woman lives in an alternative identity but at the play’s conclusion, she finds herself.Shisler said she selected the play because even before she read the whole play, she fell in love with it. Ryan Gallen, an actor in “Fire and Darkness,” said the play focuses on a man living in the city who loses his money and has to work his way up from the bottom. Also, the man falls in love with a girl but then some trouble happens.Gallen said he enjoyed participating in this play because it allowed him to exercise his dramatic skills rather than his comedic talents.Erin McClure directed “Actor’s Nightmare,” which is about a man who inexplicably stumbles into one play after another without knowing any of his lines.McClure said she actually had another play in mind but it wasn’t long enough. However, “I really loved this play,” she said. “Because for me (as an actor), I can identify with this nightmare.”Students said there were several benefits to participating in the one-acts, rather than a typical two-act play. “You perform in a lot more intimate atmosphere ee you get the opportunity to really have more fun on stage,” Shisler said.Gallen added because the plays are shorter, the lines are easier to memorize.The one-acts also offered students to step into the role of director, which they usually don’t get to do.“It’s really amazing, they stepped into the role I usually have,” Saunders said. As a result students are exposed to the successes and frustrations of the position.Through this experience, Saunders said they learned the process of communication.Tickets for the one-act plays cost $5 for students and seniors and $10 for general admission.