.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Longtime resident and volunteer bids Los Alamos farewell

-A A +A
By Kirsten Laskey

Ginny Ebinger arrived in Los Alamos in 1954 to teach music and more than 50 years later she, along with her husband, are moving to Albuquerque and leaving behind a big impression on the local community.To recognize what Ebinger has accomplished and to say goodbye, the Los Alamos County Library System, Friends of the Library and the Los Alamos Historical Society are hosting a reception from 2-4 p.m. Sunday at the Upstairs Rotunda in Mesa Public Library.Not only has Ebinger volunteered with all three organizations, she said she was also been active in “almost all the music organizations,” Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church and American Red Cross.Additionally, Ebinger said she taught outside Los Alamos through the American Orff Schulwerk Association.“I just work with people I enjoy working with and in organizations that I believe in,” she said.“She’s everywhere,” said Carol Meine, library activities coordinator. In the library system, Ebinger has served on the library board, the Friends of the Library board and the Friends’ bookstore. She also helped start the Author Speaks Series and served on the series’ selection committee. “To me, she’s invaluable,” Meine said.Charlie Kalogeros-Chattan, library manager, added she cannot think of anyone who does more than Ebinger.“Ginny is just insightful, witty; she’s just a joy to have as a friend for the library,” she said.Kalogeros-Chattan added Ebinger’s work has been an inspiration to her. “For me, she’s just a beacon of life-long learning.” She said Ebinger is always involved in new things and promoting thing in the library.“When I grow up, I wouldn’t mind being Ginny,” Kalogeros-Chattan said.Larry Campbell, Los Alamos Historical Society board president, said the Historical Society has also benefited from Ebinger. “She has been a member of the society probably for decades,” he said, “and she has been a very active volunteer for us.”Ebinger has served as a board member, vice president, and chairperson for the publication committee and even wrote a book, “Norris Bradbury.”Additionally, Campbell said, she served as the docent coordinator. “(Ebinger) not only helped us achieve many of our goals but she has shown incentive for new programs ee (we have received) very wise advice from her,” he said. “She kept us concentrated on our core missions.”Campbell continued, “Whenever there was a special need, she stepped in and took on the job. She was always willing to step in an volunteer for special projects.”Ebinger explained she and her husband decided to move to Albuquerque to “write a new chapter” in their lives.While she is looking forward to this new segment in her life, she will miss Los Alamos. “I’ll miss my friends, my home, my house, the mountains,” Ebinger said.Campbell said she cast a long shadow in Los Alamos and the things she has accomplished will certainly linger.