.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Longtime Los Alamos resident gives back to his community

-A A +A
By Kirsten Laskey

Frank Harlow, longtime Los Alamos resident, picked up his first paintbrush in 1968. “I just loved the idea of painting,” he said. Thirty-nine years and 750 paintings later, Harlow has accumulated a large art collection and is sharing it with county.Harlow donated 22 paintings to Los Alamos County, which were hung in the Upstairs Art Gallery at Mesa Public Library Thursday.“Los Alamos has been my home for many, many years so I would really like to see a bunch of them really preserved forever here in Los Alamos,” he said.Harlow added, “(I’m) happy with my life. Los Alamos has been a fabulous place for me.”“I’m thrilled Mr. Harlow has chosen to give these wonderful paintings to the county,” said Art in Public Places board member Paula Barkley, “It was an extra-ordinarily generous gift.”Harlow said he approached Stephanie Johnson of Art in Public Places, about the donation. He said she was very “enthusiastic” and the county council approved the board’s reccomendation to accept donation on Nov. 28.Harlow’s work is visible in other places in the state. He has shown his work at the Jameson Gallery in Santa Fe, the Mendosa Gallery in Taos and Cliff Dwellers Gallery in Los Alamos.Additionally, he donated work to the Museum of Indian Arts and Cultures.His specialty is Indian pottery, but Harlow said he also likes to paint cowboys, horses and animals. His old 1940 Harley Davidson also makes an appearance in many paintings. The motorcycle is on permanent collection at the Santa Fe Museum of Fine Arts.Although Harlow said he never excelled at physical activities such as sports, he always admired people who did. As a result, several of his paintings showcase activity such as steer wrestling or a fight between two cowboys.In addition to painting, Harlow has also written a number of books. He has written 11 books about northern New Mexico Pueblo pottery and is currently working on number 12.It was through his books that Harlow first became interested in painting.He explained he was doing drawings for a book when he decided it might be fun to paint.His paintings, Harlow explained, are “pouring out my life feelings.”Besides his paintings and books, Harlow worked in the theoretical division of Los Alamos National Laboratory for 50 years.The exhibit is open to the community during regular library hours, which are from 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Thursday, from 1-6 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and 1-5 p.m. Sunday. A reception will be held from 5-7 p.m. Jan. 9.