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‘Rush’ certainly Oscar worthy

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By Owen Bradbury Aranda

Although motor sports are not uncommon in the U.S., Formula One is a sport that may seem foreign to many Americans.
It is definitely a more European sport but that doesn’t make it a spectacle unfit for American audiences.
Rush, written by Peter Morgan and directed by Academy Award winning director Ron Howard, captures the brutality and raw essence of this motor sport in the 70s, during the 1976 Formula One season.
Rather than simply making another shallow racing film aimed at car enthusiasts, Howard, known for films such as Apollo 13 and A Beautiful Mind, manages to take the exhilarating sport of F1 and bring to life one of the greatest rivalries in the history of the motor sport.
The film focuses more on the human aspect of racing and the lives and risks of the drivers themselves.
The two legendary rivals in the film, James Hunt played by Chris Hemsworth and Niki Lauda played by Daniel Brühl, are portrayed as very genuine characters: incredibly skilled, audacious, daring, but also very flawed. Hemsworth’s portrayal of Hunt is incredibly compelling and captures the “cavalier party guy” attitude of the British racing driver, and depicts him as an incredibly talented individual with smilingly great confidence who hides behind a facade of invincibility and arrogance.
Brühl’s depiction of Lauda on the other hand is that of a very technical shrewd character with an unmatched rigorous precision.
These two characters bear great contrast to one another and carry the film through its thrilling narrative. The film also captures the celebrity aspect of the 1970s, a time when being a racing driver was being a superstar. Rush is most certainly an Oscar contender.
It is a brilliant film and is entirely in a class of its own when it comes to films about racing. The combination of stellar acting, superb cinematography, expert direction, an excellent script, and a magnificently captivating score composed by none other than Hans Zimmer, make the film exceptionally well rounded and easily one of the best films of 2013.