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‘Hit & Run’ is a car lover’s kind of movie

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By Owen Bradbury Aranda

 “Hit & Run” is one of those films for car people who like comedy.
The plot of the film goes like this. Charlie Bronson (Dax Shepard) a former getaway driver is living in witness protection with his girlfriend Annie Bean (Kristen Bell).
When his girlfriend is offered her dream job in Los Angeles, he risks blowing his cover to drive her to Cali. On his way there, they find themselves being chased by the cops and Charlie’s ex-gang buddy (Bradley Cooper).
From the beginning of the film, you can tell that actor/director Shepard is a true gear head. The film is basically a shout-out to some of America’s best cars and features the 2012 Cadillac CTS-V wagon, Corvette Z06, a 700-hp Baja buggy and Shepard’s very own 1964 Lincoln Continental hot rod.
Another fun fact is that Bell, who plays Shepard’s girlfriend in the movie, is also his girlfriend in real life.
The movie does have its hilarious moments, but overall, it is more concerned with cars than comedy.
Car people are bound to find the film very entertaining, but at many points implausible and illogical.
For instance, at one point in the film the couple riding in their 650-hp Lincoln find themselves being pursued by a 2002 Pontiac Solstice, which doesn’t even have half that power.
Another occasion when there is an illogical event is when the protagonists find themselves perused by the gang.
They rush toward an abandoned airfield (for no apparent reason), after which a car chase worthy of “Top Gear” (a car show) filled with drifting, donuts and power slides ensues.
Overall you’ll love the movie if you’re a car nut who wants to have a laugh, but if not, you may find the crazy car chases and automotive terms excessive, but nonetheless, it’s a pretty entertaining movie and if you were planning on watching it anyway, don’t be discouraged from doing so, you’ll like it.

Rating: 6 Atoms

Editor’s note: The atoms represent the movie’s rating. One atom means the movie was horrible, while 10 atoms means the reviewer really enjoyed it.